Top Hartland Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorneys Near You

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Fraker Law Firm, S.C.

Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorney | Serving Hartland, WI

262-347-4278

Over 30 Years of Dedicated Experience in Family Law & Divorce! I Know What You Are Going Through and I Can Help!

As an experienced Milwaukee Family Law Attorney, I am skilled at guiding individuals and families with family-law problems through the complexities and difficulties of the legal process. For 30 years I have represented clients in Ozaukee, Milwaukee, Waukesha, Washington, and Sheboygan counties, in the following practice areas: Divorce and Legal Separation Paternity Custody …

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Law Office of James R. Donohoo

Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorney | Serving Hartland, WI

Free Consultation

262-374-5589

Practicing Law for Over 34 Years

A divorce, child custody and other family law cases can be full of conflict and emotionally painful. I will represent you to help mitigate the emotional turmoil and defend your rights.  Family relationships can be complex.  I will work hard to protect your legal rights while avoiding unnecessary stress. As a skilled Milwaukee Family Lawyer, my goal is to resolve …

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Law Offices of Thomas J. Marola

Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorney | Serving Hartland, WI

Free Consultation

414-292-9814

Premier Family Law firm serving Milwaukee, Waukesha and surrounding areas. Call today for a free consultation.

Guardianship and Conservatorship Attorneys in Hartland

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Hartland Guardianship and Conservatorship Information

Have You Been Appointed as a Guardian or Conservator?

If so, you may have questions on how you can safeguard the best interests of the person you will be helping in matters of health and finance. Consult with a Hartland guardianship and conservatorship attorney who can answer all your questions regarding being a guardian or conservator for your loved one.

Legal Concept of Guardianship and Conservatorship

A guardian is a family member, close friend, or other responsible adult who the court appoints to take care of a minor child (the ward) or incompetent adult and manage hat person's affairs. A conservator also can be a family member, close friend, or other responsible adult who is appointed by a judge to manage the financial affairs and daily life of a person (the conservatee) who is unable to care for him or herself because of illness, old age, or other infirmity.

How an Attorney Can Help

An attorney can often resolve your particular legal issue faster and better than trying to do it alone. A lawyer can help you navigate the legal system, while avoiding costly mistakes or procedural errors. You should seek out an attorney whose practice focuses on the area of law most relevant to your issue.

How to Prepare for Your Initial Consultation

Prepare for your consultation by writing down notes of your understanding of the case, jot down questions and concerns for the attorney, and gather your documents. Remember that you are trying to get a sense of whether the attorney has your trust and can help you address your legal issues. Questions should include how the attorney intends to resolve your issue, how many years he/she has been practicing law and specifically practicing in your area, as well as how many cases similar to yours the attorney has handled. It can also be helpful to broach the subject of fees so that you understand the likely cost and structure of your representation by a specific attorney and/or legal team.

How will an attorney charge me?

A reputable attorney will be very upfront about how he/she will charge you. The three most common fee structures that attorneys use to charge for their services are:

  • Bill by the hour
  • Contingent fee agreement
  • Flat fee agreement

Depending on your specific legal situation, it's possible that only one type of fee structure is available. For instance, criminal defense attorneys almost always bill by the hour. In a flat fee arrangement, an attorney accepts a one-time payment to help you resolve your issue. With a contingent fee agreement, the client pays little to nothing upfront and the attorney receives a percentage of the money recovered if you win your case.

Common legal terms explained

Affidavit - A sworn written statement made under oath. An affidavit is meant to be a supporting document to the court assisting in the verification of certain facts. An affidavit may or may not require notarization.

Lead Counsel Rated Attorneys

Lead Counsel's objective process independently verifies attorney records, conferring with state bars across the country and conducting annual reviews to confirm that the attorney practices in the legal categories as indicated, possesses a valid bar license, and is eligible to practice in the specific jurisdiction.