Top Cumming Workplace Violence Lawyers Near You

The Garber Law Firm, P.C.

Workplace Violence Lawyer | Serving Cumming, GA

Free Consultation

770-618-9001

Committed to enforcing the rights of employees! Call today!

At The Garber Law Firm, we are committed to enforcing the rights of employees. We advocate aggressively to obtain justice for workers who have experienced discrimination, harassment, wrongful termination, wage and overtime violations, and theft. The law guarantees your right to receive overtime and a proper wage, and to work in an environment free of sexual harassment and …

Southworth PC

Workplace Violence Lawyer | Serving Cumming, GA

Free Consultation

404-381-1149

Experienced and Affordable Employee Rights Law Firm
Dedicated to Restoring Justice For Georgia Employees

Alan Lescht & Associates, P.C.

Workplace Violence Lawyer | Serving Cumming, GA

Free Consultation

Se Habla Español

202-463-6036

Lawyers Focusing on Federal Gov't Employees Only. Our Firm Protects Your Rights NationWide.

Workplace Violence Lawyers in Cumming

Lead Counsel Verified
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Cumming Workplace Violence Information

Workplace Violence on the Rise

The workplace is increasingly the scene of violence, and employees are suffering injuries and death while on the job and experiencing emotional trauma from witnessing violence at work. Have you been threatened or physically attacked by a coworker? Consult a Cumming attorney skilled in workplace violence law and find out what legal recourse is available to you.

Workplace Violence Law

Employers have a legal and ethical obligation to ensure the safety of employees, including implementing a plan to secure work facilities from dangerous intruders, securing tools and other objects that could be used a weapons, instituting a system of warnings and alerts when the workplace is threatened, and arranging for the safe removal of injured workers and summoning of medical and police assistance. Where an employer fails to provide and safe workplace, injured workers may bring legal action to recover for pain and suffering and other damages such as lost wages.

Top Questions to Ask When Hiring an Attorney

  • How many years have you been practicing law? How long have you practiced law in the local area?
  • How many cases similar to mine have you handled in the past?
  • What is the likely outcome for my case?

In legal practice, experience matters. An experienced attorney will likely have handled issues similar to yours many, many times. Therefore, after listening to your situation, the attorney should have a reasonable idea of the time line for a case like yours and the likely resolution.

How to Prepare for Your Initial Consultation

Prepare for your consultation by writing down notes of your understanding of the case, jot down questions and concerns for the attorney, and gather your documents. Remember that you are trying to get a sense of whether the attorney has your trust and can help you address your legal issues. Questions should include how the attorney intends to resolve your issue, how many years he/she has been practicing law and specifically practicing in your area, as well as how many cases similar to yours the attorney has handled. It can also be helpful to broach the subject of fees so that you understand the likely cost and structure of your representation by a specific attorney and/or legal team.

How will an attorney charge me?

A reputable attorney will be very upfront about how he/she will charge you. The three most common fee structures that attorneys use to charge for their services are:

  • Bill by the hour
  • Contingent fee agreement
  • Flat fee agreement

Depending on your specific legal situation, it's possible that only one type of fee structure is available. For instance, criminal defense attorneys almost always bill by the hour. In a flat fee arrangement, an attorney accepts a one-time payment to help you resolve your issue. With a contingent fee agreement, the client pays little to nothing upfront and the attorney receives a percentage of the money recovered if you win your case.

Common legal terms explained

Affidavit - A sworn written statement made under oath. An affidavit is meant to be a supporting document to the court assisting in the verification of certain facts. An affidavit may or may not require notarization.

Lead Counsel Rated Attorneys

Lead Counsel's objective process independently verifies attorney records, conferring with state bars across the country and conducting annual reviews to confirm that the attorney practices in the legal categories as indicated, possesses a valid bar license, and is eligible to practice in the specific jurisdiction.